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Discussion Starter #1
Welcome to the next "How To". As you can see, all of my Mods are to make the bike more "convenient" for me, I am not looking to modify the machine in any major way as I love the little Beast just as it is. That may change as parts become available in the U.K. Oh, except for the seat, which HAS TO GO at some early stage. Anyone who grew up a Catholic will know what kneeling on a hard surface means, anyone with an MSX will know what sitting on a hard surface means. I am now a born-again agnostic, and the seat just brings back too many old memories :)

So, the first thing to do is to remove the headlight unit. This is done by removing 4 hex screws holding the headlight on. Surely no-one wants a picture of someone undoing a screw, so straight to the picture of the inside of the headlight unit.



You can see, on the left, the two plugs that were undone from the wiring loom so that the headlight unit comes away. The indicator connectors are the Orange one on the left and the Blue one on the right.

Here is a picture of the front of the bike. The cover for the headlight plugs is ont he right of the picture. The cover on the left contains the plugs for the wiring going to the left and right handlebar switches. In the centre you can see the ribber cover that protects the ignition switch from any water ingress.



OK, what are we going to fit? This unit is quite sophisticated. I could have done this for a few £££ and I am sure many will do just that, but after spending £2600 on the bike, why scrimp?



As you can see, the unit is quite compact. It works like this. After the indicators are used, the unit will wait for x seconds (adjustable) before beeping. If you are at a junction and you have the brakes on, the beeper will be temporarily turned off until you release the brakes. I HAVE NOT FITTED THIS BIT YET - more later.

OK, here is the first wire modified. I had to remove the bulb and using a test meter find out which of the three wires going to the indicator was the flasher. As I have mentioned in other posts the Indicator is not only a flasher, it is also a Sidelight. As there is not a wiring diagram published, I had to do a certain amount of disassembly and testing to identify the correct wire. For future reference - of the three wires on each side, it is the SOLID COLOUR wire. The striped wire is the Sidelight and the green wire is the Earth.

Scotch Lock fitted, with one of the red wires from the unit.



Here, you can see both Scotch Locks and the Unit before everything is tidied up. Note the top of the Unit is off and you can see the inside (which has been filled with mastic so as to waterproof the unit. You can just see the adjustment screw for the timer. More on that in the next pics.



I took the whole unit back to the bike, plugged everything together and turned on the indicators. They flashed as they are supposed to and the beeper started about 10 seconds later. I adjusted the screw so that the beeper started about 15 seconds. This was achieved by turning the screw 1.5 turns clockwise.

I then returned to the (kitchen) table (hence the tea towel background!) and tidied up the wiring by twisting and then cable tying the two ends. The yellow wire is the one that will (eventually) connect to the brake light circuit, here it is just tucked away. When I get a wiring diagram, I will fit this. I did not want to undo the handlebar switches and goodness knows what else just to find the right wire. Life is too short and it is good riding weather today!



Finally, here is the unit stuck to the inside of the headlight and the buzzer just above it. It is a small buzzer and although it makes the right noise, it is not excessively loud. The other option was to fit it under the seat which may have been less effort, but I don't think you will hear the buzzer from there.



Finally, I put the whole thing back on the bike. Again, no pictures as it is very easy :)

Well, out for a ride now, to see if I can hear the beeps!

Ride safely,

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
UPDATE : The beeper is loud in the house when tested, but not very loud "on the road" although you can hear it O.K., it is not going to frighten little old ladies, dogs or anyone of a nervous disposition. I may resite the buzzer to point towards me, rather than into the fairing.

Jeff

If you want a cheap and cheerful buzzer, here is a wiring diagram

 

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Very awesome. I for one didn't know such things existed. But what Johnny asked: about the warranty...?

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #5
In the UK/Europe, the dealer / manufacturer would have to prove the mod caused the issue - so if the indicators failed, then they would have an argument. If the engine failed, then they wouldn't (unless I had modified the engine!). All part of Treating The Customer Fairly, Consumer Rights, Unfair Contract Terms and so on.

Jeff
 

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They should put this as standard equipment for all bikes! Good write up, I might install this on all my bikes
 

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Welcome to the next "How To". As you can see, all of my Mods are to make the bike more "convenient" for me, I am not looking to modify the machine in any major way as I love the little Beast just as it is. That may change as parts become available in the U.K. Oh, except for the seat, which HAS TO GO at some early stage. Anyone who grew up a Catholic will know what kneeling on a hard surface means, anyone with an MSX will know what sitting on a hard surface means. I am now a born-again agnostic, and the seat just brings back too many old memories :)

So, the first thing to do is to remove the headlight unit. This is done by removing 4 hex screws holding the headlight on. Surely no-one wants a picture of someone undoing a screw, so straight to the picture of the inside of the headlight unit.



You can see, on the left, the two plugs that were undone from the wiring loom so that the headlight unit comes away. The indicator connectors are the Orange one on the left and the Blue one on the right.

Here is a picture of the front of the bike. The cover for the headlight plugs is ont he right of the picture. The cover on the left contains the plugs for the wiring going to the left and right handlebar switches. In the centre you can see the ribber cover that protects the ignition switch from any water ingress.



OK, what are we going to fit? This unit is quite sophisticated. I could have done this for a few £££ and I am sure many will do just that, but after spending £2600 on the bike, why scrimp?



As you can see, the unit is quite compact. It works like this. After the indicators are used, the unit will wait for x seconds (adjustable) before beeping. If you are at a junction and you have the brakes on, the beeper will be temporarily turned off until you release the brakes. I HAVE NOT FITTED THIS BIT YET - more later.

OK, here is the first wire modified. I had to remove the bulb and using a test meter find out which of the three wires going to the indicator was the flasher. As I have mentioned in other posts the Indicator is not only a flasher, it is also a Sidelight. As there is not a wiring diagram published, I had to do a certain amount of disassembly and testing to identify the correct wire. For future reference - of the three wires on each side, it is the SOLID COLOUR wire. The striped wire is the Sidelight and the green wire is the Earth.

Scotch Lock fitted, with one of the red wires from the unit.



Here, you can see both Scotch Locks and the Unit before everything is tidied up. Note the top of the Unit is off and you can see the inside (which has been filled with mastic so as to waterproof the unit. You can just see the adjustment screw for the timer. More on that in the next pics.



I took the whole unit back to the bike, plugged everything together and turned on the indicators. They flashed as they are supposed to and the beeper started about 10 seconds later. I adjusted the screw so that the beeper started about 15 seconds. This was achieved by turning the screw 1.5 turns clockwise.

I then returned to the (kitchen) table (hence the tea towel background!) and tidied up the wiring by twisting and then cable tying the two ends. The yellow wire is the one that will (eventually) connect to the brake light circuit, here it is just tucked away. When I get a wiring diagram, I will fit this. I did not want to undo the handlebar switches and goodness knows what else just to find the right wire. Life is too short and it is good riding weather today!



Finally, here is the unit stuck to the inside of the headlight and the buzzer just above it. It is a small buzzer and although it makes the right noise, it is not excessively loud. The other option was to fit it under the seat which may have been less effort, but I don't think you will hear the buzzer from there.



Finally, I put the whole thing back on the bike. Again, no pictures as it is very easy :)

Well, out for a ride now, to see if I can hear the beeps!

Ride safely,

Jeff
I could not see the images you have shared with us. You have shared a nice information to us but the images are not visible here to tell us about the way to do it. Please make some correction.
 
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