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I lube my chains around 300 miles. I mainly just keep tabs on the condition of the chain. I personally like chain wax. Its in an spray can. Cleaning and lubing is what makes a chain last.

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I was just wondering about the Grom chain. It looks like a 420 like on my TTR 110(?) This seems like a small chain, but Honda always builds quality machines. My 2009 Honda woods bike has a continuous (linkless) 520 O-ring chain. With proper maintenance, it just may last forever. Just curious, as I have not seen it described in the Grom specs.
 

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To answer my own question, The Thailand website has a chain for the MSX 125 and it says 420 on the box. Hmmm...tiny.
 

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My 110 has about 7hp, and it does take a pounding sometimes offroad. Then again, there is no manual clutch to instantly engage the rear wheel against the asphalt, like on a street bike. Hopefully the Grom will come equipped with a good quality chain.
 

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Yes, I think a 420 is the chain they use. Anyone recommend the 'O' ring sealed chains over the regular ones? Just wondering if they're worth the extra cost.
 

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It looks like one will cost around $49 bucks but if they truly last several times longer it would be worth it.
 

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O Ring chains are the way to go. Growing up, I had motorcycles with the regular kind of chains. They are a big hassle. O ring chains are much better as they are lubed at the factory and are sealed with o rings. The lube lasts the life of the chain.

Why do we need need to lube o ring chains? To keep the chain from rusting, and to keep the o rings soft and pliable. If they dry out and fail, the lube leaks out, and dirt gets in.
 

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I've lube my 1988 Honda VLX-600, my 1089 GSXR-1100, my 1998 Suzuki TL-1000r and my 1999 Hayabusa chain almost every Friday evening after riding from work or the gym. I spray wd 40 on the chain while the rear wheel is up on a rear stand. I use a old tooth brush to get all the grip out, I also wipe down the chain after spraying it with wd-40. I make sure the chain is warm or when I just got done riding for the evening before wiping it down with wd-40. After wiping down the chain I either put a layer of 90wt gear oil or Dupont Teflon Chain-saver and wipe off any excess.

This method below is only to be used by a qualified person who has had experience around motorcycle since doing the below can result of missing fingers and injury if done wrong.
I use a back stop or old cardboard as a catcher for the old chain lube when I start the bike up on the stand and in first gear and spray wd 40 on the chain to get as much of the junk off the chain. After noticing the color change on the cardboard box from the flung chain dirt I than stop the engine and remove the key and place the gear box in neutral and make sure the kick stand is down and wipe off the chain and add my favorite chain lube. For me I use 90 wt gear oil and wipe the chain down, other chain lube I use is dupont teflon chain saver. Every so often or every 6 months I remove the counter gear cover and clean all the muck in that part of the chain/gear housing area.

for information only my 1999 hayabusa original chain lasted to the 60,000 miles mark before the chain could not handle any more adjustment and took out my counter gear and main gear. Glad I was on the way home and made it home with a lot of grinding sound.
 

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I usually do a combo-check the air in the tires, closely inspect the chain, and wash my bike every week or two, especially after it rains.
 

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Don't think the loss of a finger won't happen to you. I have a friend that I ride with who has 9.5 fingers because of using a method exactly like this. Your bike will take a finger off without even struggling. Never put it on a stand and run the engine. That's just begging to lose your fingers or hand. His hand wasn't anywhere near the sprocket at the time either... a rag got caught in the chain and then pulled his hand into the sprocket.
 

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There's never a good reason to service the chain with the engine running. And there are very good reasons to lube it every 250 miles or so.
 

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Keeping it clean is as important as lubing it. Dirt/grime acts as a grit like sandpaper. Wipe down the chain when opportunity presents with a rag and WD40. Lube with a proper chain lube every 100 miles or so, and don't buy cheap stuff, it flies off and makes a mess. When you lube, don't just "spray it on," apply it at the rear sprocket where the chain meets the sprocket, this way you're getting the lube right into the chain and between the plates. Do this on both sides. It is also best when the chain is warm, as the metal has expanded and the warmed lube can penetrate better.
Speaking of chains, if you remove it for any reason, remember, the closed end of the master link clip goes the direction the wheel/chain rotates.

Worst thing for your chain, riding in rain/wet...more grit/grime and road salts get on chain...for sure, clean and lube after every wet ride as well as wash, and never spray water or degreaser directly on chain.
 
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