Honda Grom Forums banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! :)

I've been riding my Grom/MSX125 for a few weeks now and definitely looking for more comfort. I'm rather lightweight (117 lbs) and feel every bump on the road, as if the rear shock absorber was not doing much or even amplifying them...

So far i've seen/heard about a few replacement shock absorbers for our bike but have no idea how well they will work.

Any feedback?
Thanks.

PS: these are the ones i've noticed:

Ohlins
Ohlins - Rear Shock, Ohlins, MSX125 - Other Products

YSS - budget
Y.S.S. - Rear Shock, YSS, Budget, MSX125 - Other Products

YSS - full adjustment
Y.S.S. - Rear Shock, YSS, Full Adjustment, MSX125 - Other Products

Kitako
Kitaco - Rear Shock, Kitaco, MSX125 - Other Products
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
After riding my bike for the first time yesterday I think the front needs more help then the rear but with that being said I would only buy the ohlins... Watch out for bootleg/knockoff stuff on fleabay!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's one of the question i'm wondering about considering the Ohlins - was it designed for racing or comfort? Then i'm no expert on that part, but if it allows enough twiking or adjustments, it may fit the bill? ...and the Grom/MSX is targeted at street and roads - for reasonable distances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
they were likely designed to be better performance and to handle more weight and stress.

doubt they are designed for comfort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
In the case of the Ohlins shock, we helped develop it. In fact I was the test rider.

The first thing we did was get in a few laps of the local go-kart track on the standard shock to get a feeling, and then fit the Ohlins.

The standard shock was trying it's best to kill me. No damping whatsoever. The change to Ohlins was an immediate improvement in stability through, and out of the corners.

After a couple of hours of twiddling, re-shimming and more twiddling we had a pretty good setup on the track. The biggest limiting factor was the front end.

That was all well and good for blasting round the circuit, but Ohlins also insist that the shock must have good comfort on the street.

So we put the stock shock back on and went out on the roads outside the circuit to get a bench mark.

Then the Ohlins shock went back in and it only took about 100m to realise that it was shimmed too hard on the compression side for street use.

Back on the bench and a quick re-shim.

With a rank softer compression shim stack we could then back off the rebound adjuster (which has a small effect on comp) and we had a nice and comfortable ride. Then if you wanted to hop back on the race track, you could twiddle the knob and get the shock back to 'semi-race'.

We've now developed a few shocks with Ohlins, and I have to say that their shocks for street use are developed with comfort in mind. This is more important to them than pure race performance.

That said, we've talked recently about developing pure race shocks for a couple of models, so they do obviously take that seriously too.

Ohlins are definitely one of the best bunch of blokes I've had the pleasure of working with. Incredibly knowledgeable and nothing is too much trouble when it comes to getting the shock set up correctly.

Moving on.....

Y.S.S.; Been in their factory on a few occasions. Up until we started working with Ohlins, Y.S.S. was our 'cheap' shock of choice. They had a few issues some years ago, but their quality has improved a lot.

The Y.S.S. shock is the weapon of choice for about 80% of the racers of local bikes here in Thailand such as MSX125 and CBR250R, but that's really only because the Ohlins shocks haven't been homologated yet. Once that's sorted out I'm pretty sure that the balance would swing their way.

Not sure what to say about the Kitaco shock. A cheap alternative to the stocker I suppose!

Sorry to blabber on. Hope I didn't bore you.......

Matt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
In the case of the Ohlins shock, we helped develop it. In fact I was the test rider.

The first thing we did was get in a few laps of the local go-kart track on the standard shock to get a feeling, and then fit the Ohlins.

The standard shock was trying it's best to kill me. No damping whatsoever. The change to Ohlins was an immediate improvement in stability through, and out of the corners.

After a couple of hours of twiddling, re-shimming and more twiddling we had a pretty good setup on the track. The biggest limiting factor was the front end.

That was all well and good for blasting round the circuit, but Ohlins also insist that the shock must have good comfort on the street.

So we put the stock shock back on and went out on the roads outside the circuit to get a bench mark.

Then the Ohlins shock went back in and it only took about 100m to realise that it was shimmed too hard on the compression side for street use.

Back on the bench and a quick re-shim.

With a rank softer compression shim stack we could then back off the rebound adjuster (which has a small effect on comp) and we had a nice and comfortable ride. Then if you wanted to hop back on the race track, you could twiddle the knob and get the shock back to 'semi-race'.

We've now developed a few shocks with Ohlins, and I have to say that their shocks for street use are developed with comfort in mind. This is more important to them than pure race performance.

That said, we've talked recently about developing pure race shocks for a couple of models, so they do obviously take that seriously too.

Ohlins are definitely one of the best bunch of blokes I've had the pleasure of working with. Incredibly knowledgeable and nothing is too much trouble when it comes to getting the shock set up correctly.

Moving on.....

Y.S.S.; Been in their factory on a few occasions. Up until we started working with Ohlins, Y.S.S. was our 'cheap' shock of choice. They had a few issues some years ago, but their quality has improved a lot.

The Y.S.S. shock is the weapon of choice for about 80% of the racers of local bikes here in Thailand such as MSX125 and CBR250R, but that's really only because the Ohlins shocks haven't been homologated yet. Once that's sorted out I'm pretty sure that the balance would swing their way.

Not sure what to say about the Kitaco shock. A cheap alternative to the stocker I suppose!

Sorry to blabber on. Hope I didn't bore you.......

Matt.
Thanks Matt for the feedback. I see that the Ohlins is sold out right now. When do you expect more in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
In the case of the Ohlins shock, we helped develop it. In fact I was the test rider.

The first thing we did was get in a few laps of the local go-kart track on the standard shock to get a feeling, and then fit the Ohlins.

The standard shock was trying it's best to kill me. No damping whatsoever. The change to Ohlins was an immediate improvement in stability through, and out of the corners.

After a couple of hours of twiddling, re-shimming and more twiddling we had a pretty good setup on the track. The biggest limiting factor was the front end.

That was all well and good for blasting round the circuit, but Ohlins also insist that the shock must have good comfort on the street.

So we put the stock shock back on and went out on the roads outside the circuit to get a bench mark.

Then the Ohlins shock went back in and it only took about 100m to realise that it was shimmed too hard on the compression side for street use.

Back on the bench and a quick re-shim.

With a rank softer compression shim stack we could then back off the rebound adjuster (which has a small effect on comp) and we had a nice and comfortable ride. Then if you wanted to hop back on the race track, you could twiddle the knob and get the shock back to 'semi-race'.

We've now developed a few shocks with Ohlins, and I have to say that their shocks for street use are developed with comfort in mind. This is more important to them than pure race performance.

That said, we've talked recently about developing pure race shocks for a couple of models, so they do obviously take that seriously too.

Ohlins are definitely one of the best bunch of blokes I've had the pleasure of working with. Incredibly knowledgeable and nothing is too much trouble when it comes to getting the shock set up correctly.

Moving on.....

Y.S.S.; Been in their factory on a few occasions. Up until we started working with Ohlins, Y.S.S. was our 'cheap' shock of choice. They had a few issues some years ago, but their quality has improved a lot.

The Y.S.S. shock is the weapon of choice for about 80% of the racers of local bikes here in Thailand such as MSX125 and CBR250R, but that's really only because the Ohlins shocks haven't been homologated yet. Once that's sorted out I'm pretty sure that the balance would swing their way.

Not sure what to say about the Kitaco shock. A cheap alternative to the stocker I suppose!

Sorry to blabber on. Hope I didn't bore you.......

Matt.
Nice write up!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Matt, i'm glad you shared your first hand experience - i was about to email Tyga on that matter.

I'm definitely considering the Ohlins. From what you describe i understand it can be adjusted to match the driver's weight and comfort level expected. How complicated/easy is that?

...and when do you expect to have them back in stock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
With the Öhlins its simply a case of turning the rebound adjuster.

I weigh in at about 70kg (154lb) in my normal attire. With the spring as is we get good comfort with about 14-15 clicks of rebound and for more spirited riding we wound that up to 8-9. This gave great control in the twisty bits but a little hard edged for street.

The Öhlins CEO declared it a fun ride and he's a bigger lad than me at around 100kg (220lb).

Shocks are on order so please keep an eye on the website for when the come in. Its a popular product so they sell as fast as Öhlins can put them together.

Hopefully have a front end solution shortly. We already have preload adjusters that will be back from anodizing later this week.

Matt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks again Mat for the info.

And thanks for mentioning the front end... I'm not sure whether it needs relief or hardening though... I'll worry about it when the Ohlins is in.

What do you think can be done about it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Most of you aftermarket shocks are made for racing and would need to be stiffer.
Uh, no! This is a common misconception & I hear it all the time.
The shock does not know you! It does not know if you are racing or just a street rider or anything about you! It is just a shock. It either handles the bumps out on the road/track or it does not! In this case Öhlins handles the bumps exceptionally well!

Öhlins shocks are used in racing because they work very well! Your bike will handle a lot better with good suspension. Better handling means a faster and (probably more importantly) a safer ride! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Uh, no! This is a common misconception & I hear it all the time.
The shock does not know you! It does not know if you are racing or just a street rider or anything about you! It is just a shock. It either handles the bumps out on the road/track or it does not! In this case Öhlins handles the bumps exceptionally well!

Öhlins shocks are used in racing because they work very well! Your bike will handle a lot better with good suspension. Better handling means a faster and (probably more importantly) a safer ride! :)
If you truly believe that post the stock spring rate and the Ohlins spring rate, I have my money on the Ohlins rate being higher, but please prove me wrong. A higher spring rate normally requires a stiffer damping to slow it. The only bike I have ever owned that did not require stiffer springs to ride on the track was my Rc51. That came with 1.0 kg fork springs but had no spring preload needed about a one inch preload spacer just to get the sag correct once the long top out spring was changed.

As a example the sv650 comes stock with about 0.61 kg fork springs but I use 0.95 kg for racing. Granted I'm 200 lbs but you can see the effect.

I completely admit I don't know shocks nearly as well as forks so please post the numbers and prove me wrong, I can take it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
lots of Ohlins reps in here :O

Thanks for the writeup Matt @ Tyga.

Worth every penny in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
If you truly believe that post the stock spring rate and the Ohlins spring rate, I have my money on the Ohlins rate being higher, but please prove me wrong. A higher spring rate normally requires a stiffer damping to slow it. The only bike I have ever owned that did not require stiffer springs to ride on the track was my Rc51. That came with 1.0 kg fork springs but had no spring preload needed about a one inch preload spacer just to get the sag correct once the long top out spring was changed.

As a example the sv650 comes stock with about 0.61 kg fork springs but I use 0.95 kg for racing. Granted I'm 200 lbs but you can see the effect.

I completely admit I don't know shocks nearly as well as forks so please post the numbers and prove me wrong, I can take it.
I dont know what the stock spring rate is but it is possible that Öhlins may choose a different rate. It could be softer or stiffer than the stock spring rate. Understand that the shock behind the spring will also factor info the choice of how high the spring rate should be. Most stock shocks are junk so you are only really feeling the spring! The shock behind it is providing very little damping. Öhlins will experiment/test with many differnet springs before selecting the rate that will go on into production.
But basically the spring holds up the rider. If the rider is heavy, he needs a stiff rate spring. If he is light, he will need a soft spring rate.
If you are racing & you are on the cusp of one spring rate or another a deciding factor for going with the heavier rate could be because the race track is a lot smoother than the street. So you can get away with a stiffer rate spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Does anyone know if you get to choose the spring that will come with the shock you order? I am 280 and would most likely need a stiffer spring to handle my aggressive riding style. Thanks guys.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top