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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im interested in going to school to become a motorcycle mechanic. I dont know what the best route would be to start. I was wondering if i could start as an apprentice somewhere and start that way, or is it Neccessary to go to school and become certified. Any input would be great, thanks- TIM
 

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I am from PA.
I work in the industry.
And I have a motorcycle mechanic license from an online course I took years ago.
MMI / AMI are great places, if you are willing to relocate temporarily.
One fairly close, and GOOD is PSI in Cleveland. One of my friends is an instructor there.
Also I believe York Technical Institute has a motorcycle program.

also check out WYO Tech.

but my best recommendation might be to go to your local motorcycle shop .... and talk to a technician, to see what they did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wow thanks for the feedback man, that definatly helps, im gonna look into. That online course sounds good too. how did that work out for you?
 

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the online course is something that I found advertised in Cycle World magazine back in the day. I know they still do it, but the company changed names at least 6 times since then. i don't know what it is called now.
It was fairly inexpensive, and did it mainly to further my own personal knowledge ... not to get a job in that field. I am not sure how such a certification would be viewed when applying for a job at a shop.
 

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Took some classes in the Auto-Tech program at my local Community College. Cheap, and I got a rockin' set of tools.
 

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I graduated from Southern Illinois University's auto program and worked in the automotive field for a few years before switching to motorcycles. I know several guys who went to MMI and now work in the industry. From what they've told me, it's a good program and they felt that it was worth it. Of course, it depends on what you put into it.

It's not necessary to be certified to work in a shop, but it definitely helps your employability. Keep in mind that most manufacturers have their own certification for technicians. I think MMI offers the factory certification, maybe someone can clarify on that.

What kind of experience do you have? It might be a good idea to try and get an entry level job at one of your local dealerships to see if it's for you. Maybe as a detailer or lot tech. It will give you an idea of what's its like to work at a dealership before you invest in school.
 

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I graduated from Southern Illinois University's auto program and worked in the automotive field for a few years before switching to motorcycles. I know several guys who went to MMI and now work in the industry. From what they've told me, it's a good program and they felt that it was worth it. Of course, it depends on what you put into it.

It's not necessary to be certified to work in a shop, but it definitely helps your employability. Keep in mind that most manufacturers have their own certification for technicians. I think MMI offers the factory certification, maybe someone can clarify on that.

What kind of experience do you have? It might be a good idea to try and get an entry level job at one of your local dealerships to see if it's for you. Maybe as a detailer or lot tech. It will give you an idea of what's its like to work at a dealership before you invest in school.

It is nice to have the basics down, but on the job training is where you will learn the most. Try out a job at a dealer as J-Mo suggests and see how you like working in that environment. You may find a great tudor in one of the mechanics if you show enough interest. ;)
 

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I had an old Kawasaki KD 125 when I was growing up. Could not afford to take to a shop and did good to buy the parts. I had to learn to wrench or not ride. Fortunately I was 14 years old and had plenty of time on my hands!
 

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I had an old Kawasaki KD 125 when I was growing up. Could not afford to take to a shop and did good to buy the parts. I had to learn to wrench or not ride. Fortunately I was 14 years old and had plenty of time on my hands!
Hey at least you got some good wrench time in and being 14 years old at that time, you were way ahead of a lot of people I know and me!
 

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I've worked as a mechanic most of my life. I started with military tech school and picked up skills and training as I went along. I've never worked on motorcycles professionally, but have always done my own work on my own. The mechanics aren't that different from automobiles, just smaller.
 

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I kinda wish I would have gone to a trade school for something like this. If you have any mechanical aptitude it will be easy and should come naturally to you. I really got into cars and doing my own work when I hit a deer and my father in law helped me rebuild the front end of my blazer.

I would see if you can get in locally and do some shadowing and make sure its what you want to do prior to doing it.
 
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