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this is more about mental/physical state in combat, but a lot of it rings true for motorcycles. Riding street, I tent to stay yellow unless I see a really sketchy spot (at which point bump up to orange). Racing is basically an exercise in staying in the red for as long as possible.
Arousal and Performance: How Stress and Fear Affect Tactical Performance | The Art of Manliness


read it, apply it to bikes :)

here's a couple things we're discussing on svrider

I like that. I have used color coded awareness levels for decades now(In reference to self defense), and have made the reference to staying in the YELLOW while street riding, but having never raced, I didn't make the connection between being in the red, being IN combat, and being IN a race.... Interesting.
It was a little different in defensive circles from back when, I guess..... This is how we were taught. It's a bit simpler with less levels, for simplicity.
Color Codes of Awareness
White: Unaware and unprepared. If attacked in Condition White, the only thing that may save you is the inadequacy or ineptitude of your attacker. When confronted by something nasty, your reaction will probably be "Oh my God! This can't be happening to me."
Yellow: Relaxed alert. No specific threat situation. Your mindset is that "today could be the day I may have to defend myself". You are simply aware that the world is a potentially unfriendly place and that you are prepared to defend yourself, if necessary. You use your eyes and ears, and realize that "I may have to shoot today". You don't have to be armed in this state, but if you are armed you should be in Condition Yellow. You should always be in Yellow whenever you are in unfamiliar surroundings or among people you don't know. You can remain in Yellow for long periods, as long as you are able to "Watch your six." (In aviation 12 o'clock refers to the direction in front of the aircraft's nose. Six o'clock is the blind spot behind the pilot.) In Yellow, you are "taking in" surrounding information in a relaxed but alert manner, like a continuous 360 degree radar sweep. As Cooper put it, "I might have to shoot."
Orange: Specific alert. Something is not quite right and has your attention. Your radar has picked up a specific alert. You shift your primary focus to determine if there is a threat (but you do not drop your six). Your mindset shifts to "I may have to shoot that person today", focusing on the specific target which has caused the escalation in alert status. In Condition Orange, you set a mental trigger: "If that person does "X", I will need to stop them". Your pistol usually remains holstered in this state. Staying in Orange can be a bit of a mental strain, but you can stay in it for as long as you need to. If the threat proves to be nothing, you shift back to Condition Yellow.
Red: Condition Red is fight. Your mental trigger (established back in Condition Orange) has been tripped. "If 'X' happens I will shoot that person" - 'X' has happened, the fight is on.

yep, really good summary there. i took the liberty of adjusting your explanation to motorcycle riding just to make a point.

White: Unaware and unprepared. If ridingin Condition White, the only thing that may save you is the lack of hazard or good behavior of other motorists. When confronted by something nasty, your reaction will probably be "Oh my God! This can't be happening to me."
Yellow: Relaxed alert. No specific threat situation. Your mindset is that "today could be the day I may need to avoid a hazard". You are simply aware that the world is a potentially unfriendly place and that you are prepared to swerve/brake/accelerate out of the way, if necessary. You use your eyes and ears, and realize that "I may have to emergency braketoday". You should always be in Yellow on a motorcycle. You can remain in Yellow for long periods, and don't forget to use your mirrors to "Watch your six." (In aviation 12 o'clock refers to the direction in front of the aircraft's nose. Six o'clock is the blind spot behind the pilot.) In Yellow, you are "taking in" surrounding information in a relaxed but alert manner, like a continuous 360 degree radar sweep.
Orange: Specific alert. Something is not quite right and has your attention. Your radar has picked up a specific alert. like a car nose sticking out of a driveway, a deer in the road, a sharp corner coming up You shift your primary focus to determine if there is a threat (but you do not drop your six in case the car behind you doesn't know and isn't ready to brake). Your mindset shifts to "I may have to do something evasive right now", focusing on the specific target which has caused the escalation in alert status. In Condition Orange, you set a mental trigger: "If that car/corner/animaldoes "X", I will need to stop the bike". Your brake lever should be covered in this state. Staying in Orange can be a bit of a mental strain, but you can stay in it for as long as you need to. If the threat proves to be nothing, you shift back to Condition Yellow.
Red: Condition Red is fight. Your mental trigger (established back in Condition Orange) has been tripped. "If 'X' happens I will make avoidance maneuvers" - 'X' has happened, hit the brakes.
racing is orange-red for me for basically 2 reasons: you're at the limit of your talent and tires, so every corner is an "extreme" one and everyone around is a hazard (both in front and behind)
your six constantly has someone trying to pass you (but can't turn your head much of the time so need to use ears and general understanding of what's going on). The guy in front of you is at the edge of his tires and tallent as well, so he may wipe out and take you with him, and you're trying to get around him (analyzing his weaknesses in corners while hauling ass requires a lot of brain...)
 

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ride like you stole it

ride like there is black ice on the road

ride like there is no tomorrow

But ride with a full tank of gas, fresh new tires, good brakes and clear thinking brain.
 

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very good read, got to love the heart beat range images.
a lot of people here will be in the orange-red range from how i see it
 

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Unless there is not a single other vehicle/hazard around me I am always riding with caution. I've seen the videos of cars pulling in front of bikes and taking them out. No thank you! Especially on the Grom which is small you need to be extra extra careful.
 

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