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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which Ninja 125 model are you going to go with?

ABS model is what I would recommend and get as it will be much safer, but with that comes a higher price, $4 799 compared to $5 499.

At the moment there isn't a video demonstrating the braking differe


Which Grom 125 model are you going to go with?

ABS model is what I would recommend and get as it will be much safer, but with that comes a higher price, $4 799 compared to $5 499.

At the moment there isn't a video demonstrating the braking difference between a 2013 Grom 125 and 2013 Grom 125 ABS but the following video shows what we could expect:

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzmL6s4dK44[/ame]
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
ABS would be nice, if I had the choice to choose between ABS and non ABS in whatever color I wanted I would I would of went with ABS.. But I wanted a white bike, so non-abs for me..

ABS would be nice, if I had the choice to choose between ABS and non ABS in whatever color I wanted I would I would of went with ABS.. But I wanted a white bike, so non-abs for me..
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[QUOTE="cbzdel, post: 43"]ABS would be nice, if I had the choice to choose between ABS and non ABS in whatever color I wanted I would I would of went with ABS.. But I wanted a white bike, so non-abs for me..[/quote]

Indeed it would, it's a life saver! Sucks


ABS would be nice, if I had the choice to choose between ABS and non ABS in whatever color I wanted I would I would of went with ABS.. But I wanted a white bike, so non-abs for me..
Indeed it would, it's a life saver! Sucks only lime green/ebony is the only color option for the ABS model for the U.S. Market.

Doing some further research, I discovered that the Canadian market Grom 125 gets more color options than the U.S. market Grom 125, this goes for both models!

Canadian Market Honda Grom 125 colors:

- Ebony
- Passion Red
- Lime Green/Ebony


Canadian Market Honda Grom 125 ABS colors:

- Ebony
- Ebony/Metallic Moondust Gray



VS.



U.S. Market Honda Grom 125 colors:

- Pearl Stardust White
- Lime Green/Ebony
- Ebony

U.S. Market Honda Grom 125 colors:

- Lime Green/Ebony



Note: this is going off of what's posted on Honda's website, Canadian and American.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I need to look up some pics of the "Ebony/Metallic Moondust Gray" that sounds intersting

EDIT:
[IMG]http://blog.motorcycle.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/090512-2013-kawasaki-ninja-125-3.jpg[/IMG]

I wish that was available in the USA!!!


I need to look up some pics of the "Ebony/Metallic Moondust Gray" that sounds intersting

EDIT:


I wish that was available in the USA!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I want a Ebony Ninja 125 but all we have is Lime Green & Ebony, vinyl wrapping the all the lime green to black might be something i'll consider doing.

I want a Ebony Grom 125 but all we have is Lime Green & Ebony, vinyl wrapping the all the lime green to black might be something i'll consider doing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd like the ABS version, but that $700 price hike is just too much.

I'd like the ABS version, but that $700 price hike is just too much.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
[QUOTE="cbzdel, post: 54"]I need to look up some pics of the "Ebony/Metallic Moondust Gray" that sounds intersting

EDIT:
[IMG]http://blog.motorcycle.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/090512-2013-kawasaki-ninja-125-3.jpg[/IMG]

I wish that was available in the U


I need to look up some pics of the "Ebony/Metallic Moondust Gray" that sounds intersting

EDIT:


I wish that was available in the USA!!!
Best of all, the price!

$5,999 (Canadian), If it was available in the U.S. expect it to be a few hundred cheaper, even then still a crazy price jump from the $4,799 (U.S.) starting price.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Canadians still base their prices as if they had the weak dollar of the early 90s... One thing I never understood about up there... I go there occasionally and their prices are just so weird, their prices dont seem to change based on inflation,

The Canadians still base their prices as if they had the weak dollar of the early 90s... One thing I never understood about up there... I go there occasionally and their prices are just so weird, their prices dont seem to change based on inflation, or at least from what I have noticed..
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I plan to get the ABS version next summer since I plan for this to be a commuter bike. Will likely go with the black version since I don't think the grey graphics package isn't worth the $200 price difference over the black model.

I plan to get the ABS version next summer since I plan for this to be a commuter bike. Will likely go with the black version since I don't think the grey graphics package isn't worth the $200 price difference over the black model.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I never ride in the rain if I can help it. Like most people, I started out riding a bicycle and became pretty proficient at it. My favorite way to stop was to lock the brakes and turn the bike sideways. It just always seemed like that was the quickes

I never ride in the rain if I can help it. Like most people, I started out riding a bicycle and became pretty proficient at it. My favorite way to stop was to lock the brakes and turn the bike sideways. It just always seemed like that was the quickest way to stop. It's the way ice skaters stop more quickly too although they can use the entire edge of the skate when they do that. As you turn sideways on a bike like that, I think your tired engage more area of the road too. When I need to stop in a hurry, it's what I naturally do. I understand braking in a straight line is faster with abs especially on a slippery surface, but I wonder how it compares to intentionally locking up the brakes with a controlled upright slide? That gets you off to the side as well. If ABS keeps you from locking the brakes, you probably can't do a sideways slide even if you wanted to. Just a thought. I did have to make an emergency stop a few months ago when someone in front of me started to turn right, then changed their mind and cut right out in front of me. I was on a light 200 lb. Zero S. I instintively did the brake lock, sideways move. I stopped in time and was just a bit to the left of the car's bumper which was the safest place to be. ABS may not be the fastest way to stop in all circumstances is what I am thinking.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
[QUOTE="dkw12002, post: 85"]I never ride in the rain if I can help it. Like most people, I started out riding a bicycle and became pretty proficient at it. My favorite way to stop was to lock the brakes and turn the bike sideways. It just always seemed like t

I never ride in the rain if I can help it. Like most people, I started out riding a bicycle and became pretty proficient at it. My favorite way to stop was to lock the brakes and turn the bike sideways. It just always seemed like that was the quickest way to stop. It's the way ice skaters stop more quickly too although they can use the entire edge of the skate when they do that. As you turn sideways on a bike like that, I think your tired engage more area of the road too. When I need to stop in a hurry, it's what I naturally do. I understand braking in a straight line is faster with abs especially on a slippery surface, but I wonder how it compares to intentionally locking up the brakes with a controlled upright slide? That gets you off to the side as well. If ABS keeps you from locking the brakes, you probably can't do a sideways slide even if you wanted to. Just a thought. I did have to make an emergency stop a few months ago when someone in front of me started to turn right, then changed their mind and cut right out in front of me. I was on a light 200 lb. Zero S. I instintively did the brake lock, sideways move. I stopped in time and was just a bit to the left of the car's bumper which was the safest place to be. ABS may not be the fastest way to stop in all circumstances is what I am thinking.
The mechanics of your bikes tires sliding against the pavement in a forward or sideways slide are in no way analogous to a skater's skates sliding forward or digging into the ice sideways. You're not changing the contact patch between the tires and the pavement by trying to slide sideways (which the skater effective does) and the coefficient of static friction between the bike's tires (when rolling) is much higher than the kinetic coefficient (when sliding).

tl;dr, Keeping the tires rolling is better than locking them up and trying to slide sideways doesn't change anything other than making an already dangerous stop more so.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You're probably right, but I would like to see it done as an experiment comparing the two. What does change is the vector of forward momentum. It changes from straight forward horizontal direction to a more downward direction, ie toward the road.

You're probably right, but I would like to see it done as an experiment comparing the two. What does change is the vector of forward momentum. It changes from straight forward horizontal direction to a more downward direction, ie toward the road.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not unless you're sinking into the pavement somehow. Your momentum is determined by your direction of motion and you're not going [i]down[/i], you're still traveling straight. Anyhow, we're very off topic. If you'd like me to explain more, just PM me

Not unless you're sinking into the pavement somehow. Your momentum is determined by your direction of motion and you're not going down, you're still traveling straight. Anyhow, we're very off topic. If you'd like me to explain more, just PM me.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I ride year round, and ask anyone what the weather is like in the Seattle area.. RAINY haha.. That being said, I have NEVER once locked them up in the rain and I have done plenty of emergency stops in the rain.. The only time I came close to dumpin

I ride year round, and ask anyone what the weather is like in the Seattle area.. RAINY haha.. That being said, I have NEVER once locked them up in the rain and I have done plenty of emergency stops in the rain.. The only time I came close to dumping it in the rain was when I had to do an emergency stop and then at the same time my front tire hit a HUGE hidden pothole filled with water, I didnt crash it though..

I am not knocking ABS, I know its a huge safety item.. But nothing will save you if you dont practice and know how to react to the bike itself...
 

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[B]When [/B]the time comes and you do go down, you are going to want every tool at your disposal to ensure its not going to happen again.

ABS is one of those tools. It doesn't have to be raining for you to lock up a front or back tire. I have ABS


When the time comes and you do go down, you are going to want every tool at your disposal to ensure its not going to happen again.

ABS is one of those tools. It doesn't have to be raining for you to lock up a front or back tire. I have ABS on my bike now and will probably never ride another bike without it. If i had it on my first bike I would have been able to avoid my accident. Lucky I was able to Learn from my first accident.

I would recommend ABS to anyone that has the option to get it on their bike. The 800 dollar option is well worth it in my mind.

stew
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
[QUOTE="dkw12002, post: 85"]I never ride in the rain if I can help it. Like most people, I started out riding a bicycle and became pretty proficient at it. My favorite way to stop was to lock the brakes and turn the bike sideways. It just always seemed like t

I never ride in the rain if I can help it. Like most people, I started out riding a bicycle and became pretty proficient at it. My favorite way to stop was to lock the brakes and turn the bike sideways. It just always seemed like that was the quickest way to stop. It's the way ice skaters stop more quickly too although they can use the entire edge of the skate when they do that. As you turn sideways on a bike like that, I think your tired engage more area of the road too. When I need to stop in a hurry, it's what I naturally do. I understand braking in a straight line is faster with abs especially on a slippery surface, but I wonder how it compares to intentionally locking up the brakes with a controlled upright slide? That gets you off to the side as well. If ABS keeps you from locking the brakes, you probably can't do a sideways slide even if you wanted to. Just a thought. I did have to make an emergency stop a few months ago when someone in front of me started to turn right, then changed their mind and cut right out in front of me. I was on a light 200 lb. Zero S. I instintively did the brake lock, sideways move. I stopped in time and was just a bit to the left of the car's bumper which was the safest place to be. ABS may not be the fastest way to stop in all circumstances is what I am thinking.
Hahaha that ridiculous. Also, on a related note, my favourite way to pass vehicles is to pop a wheelie and then accelerate and steer accordingly. It's just so good and safe. I feel like a peacock and that's clearly good.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I wanted the ABS, but wanted the white. So I ended up going with white, which suck that it doesn't have the ABS. even for the extra money, it's still worth the safety.

The black with gray looks sick. Like always us in the USA never get the extra


I wanted the ABS, but wanted the white. So I ended up going with white, which suck that it doesn't have the ABS. even for the extra money, it's still worth the safety.

The black with gray looks sick. Like always us in the USA never get the extra options.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Anyone have any thoughts on improving the, by most accounts, lackluster non-ABS brakes? I think some steel-braided lines could help the lever feel somewhat and some decent pads could help in the grab department, but what about going [i]too[/i] far an

Anyone have any thoughts on improving the, by most accounts, lackluster non-ABS brakes? I think some steel-braided lines could help the lever feel somewhat and some decent pads could help in the grab department, but what about going too far and overwhelming the stock tires? You don't want to be locking up every time you try to stop.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I definitely understand the advantages of getting a bike with ABS. I mean, cars have ABS and I'm pretty sure everyone who's had to slam on the brakes in a cage has whispered thanks to Baby Jesus (or whomever) that their brakes are antilock. Something

I definitely understand the advantages of getting a bike with ABS. I mean, cars have ABS and I'm pretty sure everyone who's had to slam on the brakes in a cage has whispered thanks to Baby Jesus (or whomever) that their brakes are antilock. Something to think about, though, at least for new riders: What happens when you've gotten used to ABS and you decide to upgrade to a Big Boy bike that doesn't have ABS? Sure, you can adjust to not having it, but what happens if you forget? Yeah, it's a good safety feature, but I think it could create "bad" habits.
 

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When I did my bike training - the trainer said, good technique will stop you faster than ABS ever can. I wasn't sure to believe him at first but after the training I could see what he meant.

He said the motion of your hands should look like twisting


When I did my bike training - the trainer said, good technique will stop you faster than ABS ever can. I wasn't sure to believe him at first but after the training I could see what he meant.

He said the motion of your hands should look like twisting a hand towel (ringing it out) while engaging the rear brake in moderation. ABS is when things have passed the "Sh*t I need to stop" to "F*ck I'm gonna crash"
 
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