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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a set of Grom rims to custom paint and so I started removing the dust seal and rear wheel O-ring and I tried using a brass drift to pound out the bearings "NO Luck", I bought a blind hole bearing puller kit from HFT and still no luck.

Well I texted a couple of my hayabusa friends to see if they have a trick to remove motorcycle wheel bearings and they gave me some info, not sure if it is good or bad.

Hint one, heat oven up to 250 degrees and place rim in the oven for 20 min and then try pounding it out, NO LUCK

Hint two, freeze rim since metal will shrink, nope no luck.

So anyone out there found a really good bearing removal/puller tool for motorcycle rim/wheel please chime in.
 

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I have a mini slide hammer .. its made to remove Toyota pickup pilot bearings I will take a pic of it after lunch and post it .. makes for a easy removal and the bearings will be fine
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a mini slide hammer .. its made to remove Toyota pickup pilot bearings I will take a pic of it after lunch and post it .. makes for a easy removal and the bearings will be fine

I got this from HFT with a slider and I used the smallest puller tool and it still didn't move the bearing at all, the tool kept slipping out



 

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I use this guy. [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Motorcycle-Bearing-Remover-Separator-Extractor/dp/B005SUVQUK"]Amazon.com: Motorcycle Wheel Bearing Remover Separator Extractor Puller Tool Honda Yamaha: Everything Else[/ame]

if I don't hammer in the spreader HARD it will pop out.

on yours, you need to tighten the crap out of the spreader. use a bigger wrench and really get it tightened down. seat it so the little lips are just above the line between the bearing and spacer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
K to remove the grom bearings do not get the Motion Pro tool I listed above it did not work for me so I went back to my HFT and figured out how to use it to remove the bearings and with a little bit of muscle it came out

here is the tool you should get from HFT
Search results for: 'blind hole bearing puller set'

It comes with a case and if you can get a 25% discount coupon found in most motorcycle mags, or American shooters mag or when HFT sends you their adds than you'll only pay around $54 well worth the price.


Make sure you push this part down to where it seats on the bearing and tighten, that way the tool head will not slide out and get you frustrated like I was getting.


Grom rim with bearings out


front rim, bearings gone


rear rim, bearings removed




Now time to remove the black paint and get the rim ready for custom paint/powder coating
 

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awesome, glad you finally figured it out
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What was wrong with the Motion Proo tool ? Was thinking about getting one to use on my big bike.

Thanks
I picked up the tool yesterday from Motion Pro in San Carlos and I went home to try it out.

There is nothing wrong with the tool and it's design and I figure it must be something I'm doing wrong. I did put the tool head that mates to the bearing and I put the driver on the other end "driver is a long ass bar with a standard screw driver head" that goes into the tool head opening and you use like a 3-5 lb hammer and I think I did hit it good enough to lock it in place to remove the bearings.

I think if I have heated the rim around the area of the bearing it would have worked but I did not have the proper work bench to work with since I was doing this in our kitchen.

Save your money and time and get the HFT I mentioned.
Like I mention the tool head you'll be using is the 3/8" size, just put the tool into the bearing and let it down till it stop going any further then tighten down the tool the attach the slide hammer and bang away. When putting the tool head into the bearing make sure it is not attached to the slider yet. It will make your life a lot easier to lock the head down.

Good luck all and ride safe.
 

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There is nothing wrong with the tool and it's design and I figure it must be something I'm doing wrong. I did put the tool head that mates to the bearing and I put the driver on the other end "driver is a long ass bar with a standard screw driver head" that goes into the tool head opening and you use like a 3-5 lb hammer and I think I did hit it good enough to lock it in place to remove the bearings..
that's the one i have. what i do is hammer the screwdriver thing in like crazy with the other side on the floor. then once it's good and jammed in, i stand the wheel up. sometimes it takes a couple attempts though
 

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some tips...

So, just to help understand the heat/freeze ideas... they work much better for bearing installs.

when it's time to install the bearing you can heat your wheel and stick your bearings in the freezer for a bit.... should slide in pretty easy.

For removal the idea with heat is to use a torch to heat the material around the bearing, but this isn't as easy for an enclosed bearing such as these. Plus, you don't want to get too much heat on the aluminum.

As a life-long car guy, I've used heat to remove lots of things, but these bearings are best removed using the correct tools (seat/bearing remover similar to the one shown earlier). There are screw types that actually work a little easier than the slide hammer, but it works fine. If you have a bearing on a shaft, such as an axle bearing for a car... you can put some heat on the bearing to loosen it, plus you aren't worried about jacking up the bearing you're removing. There are some other bearings that are seated similar to these you can use a torch to heat the area around, but those are usually cast steel/iron. If you get the area too hot, then the bearing gets hot as well and then you have defeated the purpose. Plus, the bearing will expand quicker because the metal is thinner.

Sorry about long winded post, just wanted to get people straight before they put a torch to their good parts. :)
 

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One more tip... I've used heat to heat the area around a bearing in a knuckle on a 1 ton 4x4 front axle and took "liquid air" with the can turned upside down to cool the bearing. I think it's nitrogen, but it comes out freezing and you can blast around the bearing or seat to cool that metal. WOrked on an old axle I pulled from a junk yard that was REALLY crapped up.
 
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