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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

i got a grom almost 3 weeks ago now, done just over 120 miles, its my first geared bike.

Just wondering what RPM i should be at to shift gear? and also i mainly stick to 30mph while traveling to work as its all housing routes, should i be in 3rd all the way or 4th?

ive got the hang of setting off, cornering, now really just want to try and learn as much as possible and maybe a way to ride keeping the bike healthy and saving petrol.

Any advice would be really apreciated.

Be gentle!:CBCGW:
 

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Well, if you want to haul ass, pin it til it stops pulling, forget abouth the tach. I know that's kind of hard on such a slow bike but you'll get it. Do this: while riding in traffic, start by shifting at say, 4k. If you are being dusted by all the cars, turn it up a little bit. Also, you will be able to tell if you're lugging the engine if it doesn't sound or feel like its running smoothly. It is better to shift at a higher rpm, than to shift low and have to hold it wide open all the time. Wide open means its working hard, high rpm not as much. You'll get it, just keep riding and you'll pick it up. Just don't be that guy who always rides around with the engine revved to the nuts the whole time. Some guys just hold a bike in one gear and spin the hell out of the motor for no good reason. That won't destroy it, but it's just unnecessary.
 
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Congrats on the new bike. Pull off and look at the bottom of your seat.
If the instruction manual is not there; go back to the dealer and tell them
you did not get one.

If you want the best mileage, use the recommended shift points.
Basically: shift up at 4000 rpm and down at 2000 rpm.
That puts you in 4th gear around 25 mph so you will be in 4th on your
ride to work. If your route is flat and smooth, and you ride it gently;
you should get better than 150 mpg. I have posted test results on this site.
Good luck.
 

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Yeah what they said for most cruising I rfind myself in 4th. Sometimes in traffic ill stay in 3rd to give myself a little more powerband to blip and stay away from the cages depending on how retarded they are acting. Most of my streets are 25-35 though
 

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Whenever you wanna go faster hit the lever..... But seriously it's going to be personal preference and riding style
 

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On little motors like this you can step your shifts.
1-2 4500 rpm
2-3 4750 rpm
3-4 5000 rpm
That way you are a bit higher in the powerband for
the taller gears.

I would do the 1-2 shift at 6750 or 7000 rpm.
 

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"When to shift? same as when to sh!t
Too early and you just did it for no reason, too late, and you've got a problem."
 

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Uhm, i usually shift at 7k+, but i like to go 'fast'.
 

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OK, no offense, but I am going with the assumption that your knowledge of high performance, racing, engines and the like is minimal, so I'll make this simple

You've seen these before, it's a "Dyno Chart" (this one is from a Grom).
For now, forget the number, notice how the curve goes up, and at some point, the curve goes downward....in the simplest explanation...that's a "power curve"
While the line is going UP, is when you feel the engine pulling you forward, and at the very top is where that little engine is screaming at the top of the RPM's, so much so, the power (curve) starts to drop off.
Understand....engine pull is while line is going up, top of rev's is top of that curve, and when you feel the power falling off at the top of those rev's, is "over-revving"
You want to shift right about, or right before, you feel that power falling off...before it goes downward on that curve....make sense?



Or you can do like my Dad said when I was learning to race, "rev it until you think it's going to blow up, then shift"
That's works great on 85cc 2-strokes, not so much bigger engines, but I think you get the idea.

Learn to FEEL your engine....FEEL IT....it will tell you when to shift, you don't need to look at the tach.

You shift too soon, engine will be slow and bogged down
Too late, you'll know, but likely never get there any way
 

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Learn to FEEL your engine....FEEL IT....it will tell you when to shift, you don't need to look at the tach.

You shift too soon, engine will be slow and bogged down
Too late, you'll know, but likely never get there any way
X2. That's the way I was taught.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice one, thanks a lot for the advice guys much appreciated. Rode it to work today and did what you all said, I am getting used to the bike now and kinda know when to change without looking at the rpm!

Wish I'd have taken riding up sooner!
 

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Nice one, thanks a lot for the advice guys much appreciated. Rode it to work today and did what you all said, I am getting used to the bike now and kinda know when to change without looking at the rpm!

Wish I'd have taken riding up sooner!
That's good, congrats and welcome to the crazy world of motorcycles

While riding, as said above, learn to feel the engine and how and where it responds (makes power).

There's three basic parts of power delivery, called a "powerband," where you have power delivered at the "bottom end," "middle," or "top end" of that power curve, every engine is different in how/where it delivers power most effectively. Typically, smaller engines generate more power through higher rev's (top end power) and bigger engines typically make power in the lower rev's (bottom end of power). Some engines just like to run and make power in the middle...so learn to feel the engine, and YOU respond to IT.
This is how you can become one with the bike and engine and it then all feels so natural.

Have fun!
 
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